Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Venetucci pumpkin ale



 
I have been meaning to post a little something about Venetucci Pumpkin Ale for over a year now.  It is made in Colorado Springs by the Bristol Brewing Company.  Since his Lordship has offered to take me out for a beer tomorrow to Bristol (he needs to fill his 3 growlers you see),  I thought now would be a good time to share the history of the Venetucci Pumpkin legacy.   A long time ago there was a nice man named Nick Venetucci.  He could have been a professional baseball player, but gave it all up to run the family farm.  Along with his wife Bambi, Nick distributed hundreds of pumpkins every Halloween to children free of charge. When they died, they donated the farm to the Pikes Peak Community Foundation to be run as a nonprofit so that it would continue to give away pumpkins every fall.  Nick and Bambi believed every child should have a pumpkin.

In memory of them, Bristol brews a seasonal pumpkin ale with all profits donated to Venetucci Farm.  It is much sought after by local beer lovers.  Two years ago, at the front range BBQ fundraiser, his Lordship and I bid on and won a bottle.  While pumpkin beer is not my favorite,  I do have to say that this is a good one.

You can visit Bristol's website or the Pike Peak Community Foundation if you want to check the legitimacy of the story I just told you.

Last fall, Bristol had some beautifully carve pumpkins.  I have to learn to do them like this.


 

8 comments:

  1. I love the background story and while I am not fond of ale, I really want to try this!

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    1. It's a good one although you might have trouble finding it in Canada.

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  2. Replies
    1. Well, no one knows really. I found a website with a few silly theories but I think it is a mystery. All I know is that since we started filling our growlers weekly, the waste we produce has been substantially reduced. His Lordship loves his draft beer.

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  3. I didnt know this but wiki sez:

    The term likely dates from the late 19th century when fresh beer was carried from the local pub to one's home by means of a small galvanized pail. It is claimed the sound that the CO2 made when it escaped from the lid as the beer sloshed around sounded like a growl.

    Or could be my tummy anxiously awaiting a fave draught

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    1. Growling buckets huh? Interesting.

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  4. Sounds like something one might incorporate into haunt!

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